Japan TRAVEL

Tokyo, Japan • June2015 • Asakusa Temple

he Nakamise shopping street stretches over approximately 250 meters from Kaminarimon to the main grounds of Sensoji Temple. It is lined by more than 50 shops, which offer local specialties and the usual array of tourist souvenirs.

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“Asakusa (浅草) is the center of Tokyo’s shitamachi (literally “low city”), one of Tokyo’s districts, where an atmosphere of the Tokyo of past decades survives.”

Asakusa can easily be explored on foot. Alternatively, you can consider a guided tour on a rickshaw (jinrikisha, literally “man powered vehicle”). A 30 minute tour for two persons costs around 9000yen. Shorter and longer courses are also available.

Asakusa’s main attraction is Sensoji, a very popular Buddhist temple, built in the 7th century. The temple is approached via the Nakamise, a shopping street that has been providing temple visitors with a variety of traditional, local snacks and tourist souvenirs for centuries.

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Wish they had kimono rentals so I can be as cute as these two.

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Kaminarimon (Kaminari Gate)

Kaminarimon is the first of two large entrance gates leading toSensoji Temple. First built more than 1000 years ago, it is the symbol of Asakusa. The Nakamise shopping street leads from Kaminarimon to the temple grounds.

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Nakamise Shopping Street

The Nakamise shopping street stretches over approximately 250 meters from Kaminarimon to the main grounds of Sensoji Temple. It is lined by more than 50 shops, which offer local specialties and the usual array of tourist souvenirs.

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School girls along Shin-Nakamise Shopping Street

Shin-Nakamise or “New Nakamise” runs perpendicular to theNakamise Shopping Street. It is a covered shopping arcade lined by various shops and restaurants.

Randoseru keychains!

Hello Kitty in a kimono <3

Sensoji (浅草寺, Sensōji, also known as Asakusa Kannon Temple) is a Buddhist temple located inAsakusa. It is one of Tokyo’s most colorful and popular temples.

When approaching the temple, visitors first enter through the Kaminarimon (Thunder Gate), the outer gate of Sensoji Temple and the symbol of Asakusa and the entire city of Tokyo.


O-mikuji (御御籤, 御神籤, or おみくじ o-mikuji)

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“Random fortunes written on strips of paper at Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples in Japan. Literally “sacred lot”, these are usually received by making a small offering (generally a five-yen coin as it is considered good luck) and randomly choosing one from a box, hoping for the resulting fortune to be good. (As of 2011 coin-slot machines sometimes dispense o-mikuji.)”

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I have ‘Regular Fortune’ :))

Couple fashion alert!

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If you get a bad fortune, you are supposed to fold the strip of paper and tie it to the nearest wall of metal wires. Away with you, bad fortune!

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Very cute Japanese kids going home from school. They have the cutest uniforms! Makes me want to purchase a sailor style cardigan /hahaha, so deprived.

Tea’s Tea peach flavour.
Did you know that this is available in Manila? Hurrah for Family Mart!

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Stalker mode on. I love her kimono so much!


Met up with my high school friend Irene and Gervin; who is one of Tricia’s ‘Tokyo friends’ despite the heavy rain. Thanks guys for having time for me, see you soon (?!)

Obviously lacking in the food photography skills :p


Source: Japan Guide, http://howibecametexan.com/ and Wikipedia

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